Review: The World’s Strongest Librarian

Format: Hardback

worlds-strongest-librarianLength: 291 pages

Publication: May 2nd, 2013 by Gotham

Source: Library

What it’s about: 

Josh Hanagarne couldn’t be invisible if he tried. Although he wouldn’t officially be diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome until his freshman year of high school, Josh was six years old and onstage in a school Thanksgiving play when he first began exhibiting symptoms. By the time he was twenty, the young Mormon had reached his towering adult height of 6’7″ when — while serving on a mission for the Church of Latter Day Saints — his Tourette’s tics escalated to nightmarish levels.

Determined to conquer his affliction, Josh underwent everything from quack remedies to lethargy-inducing drug regimes to Botox injections that paralyzed his vocal cords and left him voiceless for three years. Undeterred, Josh persevered to marry and earn a degree in Library Science. At last, an eccentric, autistic strongman — and former Air Force Tech Sergeant and guard at an Iraqi prison — taught Josh how to “throttle” his tics into submission through strength-training.

Today, Josh is a librarian in the main branch of Salt Lake City’s public library and founder of a popular blog about books and weight lifting—and the proud father of four-year-old Max, who has already started to show his own symptoms of Tourette’s.

The World’s Strongest Librarian illuminates the mysteries of this little-understood disorder, as well as the very different worlds of strongman training and modern libraries. With humor and candor, this unlikely hero traces his journey to overcome his disability — and navigate his wavering Mormon faith — to find love and create a life worth living.

What I thought:

You know that feeling of satisfaction you get when you read just the right book at just the right time? That was what the experience of reading this book did for me. I finished it a few nights ago and I actually cried when it was over because I was so relieved to have found it now. I’d heard good things when the book first came out in 2013, but now was exactly the right time for me to read it.

My oldest daughter was diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome earlier this year. It was something I’d suspected for a while, but having the official diagnosis made it real in a way that I’m still struggling to accept. I’ve been reading nonfiction books about TS and looking for more information online, but reading a memoir of someone with the disorder who writes about his experiences with such earnestness and humor gave me something that all the medical books and articles couldn’t–a sense of peace.

That may seem strange considering just how hard Hanagarne’s life has been because of Tourette’s. He doesn’t pull any punches (literally), and I read about his experiences with a mixture of sadness and admiration for how he persevered in spite of being dealt a tough genetic hand. I think part of why I found the book comforting was that despite the extreme nature of his Tourette’s condition, he manages to eventually carve out a fairly normal life for himself. He has a good job, friends, a wife and son, and perhaps most importantly he doesn’t seem bitter about all that he has had to endure.

The biggest factor in Hanagarne’s success seems to have been a very loving and supportive family, and that gives me hope that our daughter’s outcome can be the same. I want more than anything for her to be accepting of herself and proud of all that she can do, none of which having Tourette’s can take away from her. I want her to find a sense of peace with her diagnosis, too, and to know that no matter what, her family will always have her back. She’s still very young and I don’t doubt that there are harder days ahead, but Hanagarne’s story gives me hope.

Highly recommended.

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3 thoughts on “Review: The World’s Strongest Librarian

  1. Laurie C

    What a close and personal connection you made with this book! I loved The World’s Strongest Librarian, which I picked up mainly because it was a librarian memoir, but it was so much more than that! Wishing you and your daughter and whole family lots of luck in your new situation! Reading and researching a topic is always good, but sometimes a memoir by someone with a shared experience is exactly what you need. I just read A Bittersweet Season: Caring for Our Aging Parents and Ourselves for that reason.

    Reply
  2. Claire 'Word by Word'

    I can only imagine how wonderful it must have been after all your researching and the recent diagnosis to come across this book, it sounds like an amazing story and an interesting journey to find something that worked for him to enable the life he so desired.

    Courage to you too, when our children have these challenges to live with, it is often just as hard on the parents due to all the anxiety, and our own need for support, I hope you able to access all that you need and have all the loving support you need around you too.

    Reply

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